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Press Releases

  • September 29, 2016

    Montreal team discovers new molecular pathway key to understanding fat/cancer links

    A new publication from the TFRI-funded team at McGill University (Goodman Cancer Centre) studying oncometabolism and molecular pathways is bringing new hope to the battle against obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes with the significant discovery of a new molecular pathway that has the ability to turn fat storage cells into fat burning cells.

  • September 29, 2016

    Dual expression study helps identify B-cell lymphoma patients at high risk for CNS relapse

    Despite improvements in outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the monoclonal antibody rituximab treatment era, central nervous system (CNS) relapse continues to occur and typically is incurable. Identifying high-risk patients is essential to focus on effective prophylaxis strategies. To date, there have not been any identified robust biomarkers to predict those at high risk. Previous seminal studies from the BC Cancer Agency have identified MYC and BCL2 dual expression to be associated with poor outcome. Importantly, a study published in Blood (May 2016) by a TFRI-funded team suggests that dual expression of MYC and BCL2 tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is associated with an increased risk of CNS relapse.

  • September 29, 2016

    Ovarian cancer: Mapping the clonal spread

    A team of B.C.-based, TFRI-funded scientists are breaking new ground with a recent study that tracked the clonal spread and intraperitoneal mixing of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOvCa), the deadliest subtype of the disease.

  • September 29, 2016

    New class of small molecules enhances OV replication

    An innovative paper by Dr. Jean-Simon Diallo (TFRI-funded Canadian Oncolytic Virus Consortium (COVCo) and collaborators Drs. Jeffrey Smith and Christopher Boddy was published in Scientific Reports (May 2016). They discovered and developed a class of new small molecule compounds that selectively enhance oncolytic viruses (OV) in cancer tissue, making them more likely to destroy tumour cells and eradicate the disease.

  • September 29, 2016

    Ultrasound, imaging effective tools to monitor treatment response

    Terry Fox-funded researchers have made a critical finding in monitoring breast cancer patient response to chemotherapy treatment: patient response to treatment can be detected in as little as one week by using optics and ultrasound respectively instead of waiting the traditional four to six months. Their findings were published in Oncotarget (March 2016).

  • September 27, 2016

    TFRI's 2017 ASM meeting date, location

    In 2017, TFRI will hold its Annual Scientific Meeting on November 4th to coincide with the national meeting of the Canadian Cancer Research Conference in Vancouver (Nov. 5-7th). Stay tuned for more details.

  • September 07, 2016

    TFRI ANNOUNCES 2016 FUNDING COMPETITION AWARD RECIPIENTS

    Vancouver, BC – Six outstanding Canadian research teams will use $27.3 million in new funding to engineer precision medicines for patients whose cancer has relapsed or for whom current treatments are ineffective or non-existent.

  • July 14, 2016

    “Smart” nanoparticle (PEARLs) a promising gem to target and treat tumours with greater precision

    Dr. Gang Zheng and a team of biomedical researchers have discovered a "smart," organic, biodegradable nanoparticle that uses heat and light in a controlled manner to potentially target and ablate tumours with greater precision.

  • July 14, 2016

    Stem cell scientists discover genetic switch to increase supply of stem cells from cord blood

    International stem cell scientists, co-led in Canada by Terry Fox-funded scientist Dr. John Dick and in the Netherlands by Dr. Gerald de Haan, have discovered the switch to harness the power of cord blood and potentially increase the supply of stem cells for cancer patients needing transplantation therapy to fight their disease.

  • June 14, 2016

    Study by TFRI-funded team underscores importance of accurate diagnosis for rare ovarian and other cancers

    Terry Fox-funded cancer researchers in BC led an international study to develop a new method to improve diagnosis of a rare sub-type of ovarian cancer that has been notoriously difficult to accurately identify. The team has created an algorithm to diagnose and predict the clinical course of granulosa cell cancers of the ovary.

  • June 03, 2016

    Terry Fox researcher leads international conference on ‘devastating’ cancer predisposition syndrome

    Terry Fox-funded researcher Dr. David Malkin, The Hospital for Sick Kids, Toronto, Ontario, was in Columbus, Ohio this week to co-lead the 2016 International Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) Conference. TFRI funds two projects led by Dr. Malkin, including one focusing solely on LFS.

  • April 22, 2016

    Dr. Victor Ling receives lifetime achievement award

    Congratulations to Dr. Victor Ling, TFRI's President and Scientific Director, who has been honoured with the LifeSciences BC Dr. Don Rix Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award celebrates his many contributions to cancer research over his career.

  • April 21, 2016

    Women more likely to survive cancer than men

    A report by Statistics Canada suggests that women have significantly better survival outcomes than men for a majority of cancers in Canada. While the reasons are not yet understood, hormonal influences are thought to be an important factor. The full report, "Differences in cancer survival in Canada by sex" can be read on the Statistics Canada website.

  • March 15, 2016

    Rolland (Rolly) Murray Fox: 1935-2016

    Rolly Fox-smallRolland (Rolly) Murray Fox was born March 22, 1935 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Rolly was the third of nine children born to Rodney Fox and Bertha (Shale) Fox...

  • April 20, 2015

    Pancreatic cancer loses viral defences when talking with supporting cells

    Ottawa, ON -- Terry Fox funded researchers in Ottawa have found a way to make pancreatic cancer cells more vulnerable to cancer-killing viruses, known as oncolytic viruses. In a paper published today in Nature Medicine, the scientists describe how they can exploit the communication, or cross-talk, between pancreatic cancer and a specific cell type that supports the tumour.

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