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  • Terry Fox-funded lymphoid cancer group discovers new, recurrent genetic mutation in two kinds of lymphoma

    by User Not Found | Feb 16, 2014
    Dr. Christian Steidl (right) with his PhD student Jay Gunawardana, first author of the Nature Genetics study. Photo: Cameron Heryet/BC Cancer Agency 

    Dr. Christian Steidl (right) with his PhD student Jay Gunawardana, first author of the Nature Genetics study. Photo: Cameron Heryet/BC Cancer Agency

    Vancouver, B.C. -- Researchers funded by the Terry Fox Foundation and based at the BC Cancer Agency’s Centre for Lymphoid Cancer in Vancouver have discovered a new, recurrent genetic mutation in two kinds of lymphoma -- Hodgkin lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL).

    Their findings, published February 16 in Nature Genetics, provide scientific proof that the altered gene PTPN1 plays a role in human cancer and point to the possibility of a new way to personalize treatment for lymphoma patients. PMBCL is a distinct subtype of aggressive B-cell lymphoma which affects predominantly young females but may also occur in children and adolescents. Lymphoma is the fifth most common cancer in Canada.


    PhD student Jay Gunawardana. Photo: Cameron Heryet/BC Cancer Agency

    Study lead Dr. Christian Steidl, department of experimental therapeutics at the BC Cancer Research Centre and an assistant professor of pathology at the University of British Columbia, says the discovery is a world first. “Our work identifies, for the first time, the entirety of genetic mutations in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and first-of-its kind-mutations in the PTPN1 gene.” He says the study shows how cancer cells profit from these genetic mutations to the detriment of affected patients through activation of cellular signaling that ultimately leads to tumour growth.

    The discovery is promising for lymphoma patients who carry these mutations because it provides potential new targets for treating the disease with new therapeutics, including for those who do not respond to standard treatment, says Dr. Steidl.

    For the study, investigators used high throughput sequencing to analyze the whole-genome and whole transcriptome of 10 index samples, which was followed by targeted sequencing of about 100 human samples and lab-developed cell-lines which revealed “highly recurrent and novel gene mutations in the PTPN1 gene.” The Vancouver Centre has one of the largest collections of these samples in the world.

    Dr. Steidl is a principal investigator on the Terry Fox New Frontiers Program Project Grant in Molecular Correlates of Treatment Failure in Lymphoid Cancers (2013-2106). The programs are now managed by TFRI.

    Read the Nature Genetics paper online

    Read the Vancouver Sun article

     

  • Federal funding to new $15M centre of excellence for personalized medicine a boost for TFRI’s investment in colorectal cancer

    by User Not Found | Feb 07, 2014

    C4 Research Team

    TFRI’s C4 team members gathered for a project meeting in Ottawa in May 2013

    Jan. 31, 2014

    Vancouver, BC -- TFRI’s efforts to improve outcomes for colorectal cancer patients received a vote of confidence this week with the announcement that a pan-Canadian initiative comprising colorectal researchers supported by TFRI, has been awarded $15-million from the federal government to establish a Business-Led Network of Centres of Excellence (BL-NCE) in Precision Therapeutics.

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer in Canada.  One in 14 men and one in 15 women is likely to develop the disease.


    Dr. Gerald Batist and Dr. Thérèse Gagnon-Kugler

    “We extend hearty congratulations to this team –which includes our C4 clinicians and scientists -- for their success in securing this new NCE and federal funding for PreThera. We are extremely delighted to see that TFRI-funded translational research is now attracting the attention of and investment from partners in government, the biotech and pharma industries, and other not-for-profits within the research sector.  We look forward to working with these new partners and see this as a great opportunity to bring better, safer treatments to patients through an expanded network of both funders and partners,” said TFRI president and scientific director Dr. Victor Ling.

    In October 2012 TFRI awarded $1.2 million to the Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consortium (C4) to support its creation and purpose: to reduce  incidence and mortality for colorectal patients while increasing survival and improving quality of life.  Co-led by Dr. Gerald Batist (Segal Cancer Centre and Jewish General Hospital, Montreal ) and Dr. Steven Gallinger (Mount Sinai Hospital and University Health Network, Toronto) , C4 has built pan-Canadian linkages over the last 15 months with leading colorectal cancer clinicians and scientists across the country to jointly collaborate on the development of  state-of-the-art diagnostics and therapeutics for these patients.  To date, the team has focused on creating a pan-Canadian high-risk colorectal cancer registry with the goal of detecting colorectal cancer earlier, and is also studying tissue and biomarkers to identify new therapies where there is tumour resistance to existing treatments.

    Dr. Batist says he is delighted by the NCE and is also grateful to TFRI for its initial support.  “TFRI funding has provided us with a scaffold to reach out and spread across the country and build the needed infrastructure to undertake population-based observational studies of all cancer patients and to develop a database to identify patients who will respond to a particular treatment. We can (now) find the extraordinary responders and understand what they look like at the proteomic and genomic levels.”

    In supporting C4’s NCE application, TFRI advised that it will provide nearly $3.9 million (over approximately four years) to support the work of the C4, subject to the project’s successful review.  The TFRI funding will support clinical trial work at  10 sites across five provinces where more than 2,000 colorectal cancer patients and relatives will be recruited to participate in studies to help identify new treatments and diagnostics.

    “This (NCE) has the potential to change everything -- to really redefine things and move us forward in terms of personalized treatments and diagnostics to better help our society and our patients. TFRI is an important player in this arena and we believe they have to continue to be involved. We hope they will be,” said Dr. Batist. 

    The public-privately funded NCE is focused on long-term follow up of patients and molecular profiling of their tumor. “It is well known that most cancer are in fact a multitude of sub-populations of different cancers, all owning to a distinct molecular signature,” said NCE CEO Therese Gagnon-Kugler in a release issued Jan. 31.

    The BL-NCE funding is provided over five years by the federal government to address industry research and development challenges. Under the program, partners pay at least half of each network’s eligible direct research costs. With partner investment the total committed to the project is $32 million.  The program brings the academic and private sectors together to address current challenges in key priority areas such as personalized cancer treatment.

     

    Related Links

    http://www.qcroc.ca/en/events-news-and-publication/news/terry-fox-research-institute-awards-research-grant-unite-canadian

  • Canadian Cancer Research Alliance honours Dr. Ling with Exceptional Leadership in Cancer Research award

    by User Not Found | Oct 28, 2013




    Dr. Victor Ling

    October 28, 2013 (TORONTO) - The Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (CCRA) announced today the recipients of its biennial awards which recognize significant contributions to cancer research in Canada

    Dr. Victor Ling receives the award for Exceptional Leadership in Cancer Research for his outstanding contributions to the leadership of cancer research, including his role as the visionary inaugural leader of the Terry Fox Research Institute and his contribution to the development of a Canadian strategy for cancer control which ultimately led to the formation of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    Dr. John E. Dick receives the award for Outstanding Achievements in Cancer Research for his seminal research and leadership in the field of stem cell research, including his role in providing the first proof that cancer stem cells are not created equally.

    Mr. Bob McDonald receives the award for Distinguished Service to Cancer Research for his dedication to science education and communication through radio as a broadcaster and author.

    “These awards are our way to acknowledge the exceptional contributions made by these individuals,” says Dr. Christine Williams, Co-Chair of the CCRA. “We are proud to highlight their achievements and the impact they have had on cancer research and the cancer research community.”

    The awards will be presented during the CCRA’s Canadian Cancer Research Conference held in Toronto from November 3-6, 2013. For more information, please visit http://www.ccra-acrc.ca

    For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact:

    Lenore Bromley (all winners)

    Communications Officer

    Canadian Partnership Against Cancer

    (416) 915-9222 x 5781

    lenore.bromley@partnershipagainstcancer.ca
    Kelly Curwin (for Dr. Victor Ling)

    Chief Communications Officer

    Terry Fox Research Institute

    Office: (604) 675-8223

    Cell: (778) 237-8158

    kcurwin@tfri.ca

     

    Jane Finalyson (for Dr. John Dick)

    Senior Public Affairs Advisor

    Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

    University Health Network

    (416) 946-2846

    jane.finlayson@uhn.ca
    Chuck Thompson (for Mr. Bob Macdonald)

    Head, Media Relations

    CBC Services

    (416) 205-3747

    chuck.thompson@cbc.ca

    Dr. Victor Ling, Vancouver, BC: Dr. Ling is the founding President and Scientific Director of the Canada-wide Terry Fox Research Institute, an Institute that involves more than 50 cancer research institutes, hospitals, and universities across Canada (http://www.tfri.ca). He is a Distinguished Scientist at the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA), Professor of Pathology, and Professor of Biochemistry at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He served previously as Vice President of Discovery Research at the BCCA and Assistant Dean at UBC. In that capacity he was instrumental in launching in 1998 the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre in Vancouver that was the first to decode the SARS virus, and leading the initiative to - construct– the new BC Cancer Research Centre - in 2005 that currently is home to over 650 research staff including over 200 trainees. He served on many national and international boards and committees for cancer research. Notably, he chaired the working group that produced the “Ling report” on cancer research for the Canadian Strategy for Cancer Control (CSCC). CSCC ultimately led to the formation of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    As a scientist at the Ontario Cancer Institute, Dr. Ling - discovered - the P-glycoprotein (named MDR) associated with multiple drug resistance in cancer, the sister of P-glycoprotein (named BSEP), the bile acid transporter in liver, and the super family of ABC transporters.

    Dr. John E. Dick, Toronto, ON: Dr. Dick is a Senior Scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine of the University Health Network and Professor of Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto. Dr. Dick is also Director of the Program in Cancer Stem Cells at the Ontario Institute of Cancer Research (OICR).

    Dr. Dick’s research has revolutionized the study of normal and leukemic human stem cells. Two of the most important achievements were developing a system for transplanting normal and malignant human hematopoietic cells into immune-deficient mice; and using this method to identify and characterize both normal and leukemic human stem cells. His lab established that only a small proportion of human leukemic cells were capable of initiating human leukemia within the immune-deficient mice. Purifying these leukemia-initiating cells provided direct evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis.

    Dr. Dick has achieved groundbreaking findings in the areas of hematopoiesis and cancer. Through his work, he has pioneered the field of cancer stem cell biology, transformed our views of the origin and nature of cancer, and laid the foundation for new approaches to cancer therapy.

    Mr. Bob McDonald, Victoria, BC: One of Canada’s best known science journalists, Mr. McDonald has been presenting the Quirks and Quarks program since 1992. Mr. McDonald is also a regular science commentator on the CBC News Network, and science correspondent for CBC TV’s The National. Before joining Quirks and Quarks, Mr. McDonald was the host of CBC Television’s children’s science program Wonderstruck. He is also the author of two books based on the program, Wonderstruck I and II. Mr. McDonald also hosted and wrote a children’s TV science series, Heads Up!, which ran for 3 seasons on TVO and the Knowledge Network. In addition, he is Chairman of the Board for Geospace Planetarium. Fall 2000 saw the release of Mr. McDonald’s book, Measuring the Earth with a Stick: Science as I’ve Seen it. The book, which was short-listed for the Canadian Science Writers Association Book Award, is a collection of essays reflecting on his 25 years as a science journalist.

    The Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (CCRA) is comprised of 31 organizations that collectively represent the custodians of the majority of taxpayer dollar and donations devoted to investing in research that will lead to better ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat cancer and improve survivor outcomes. Its membership includes federal research funding programs/agencies, provincial research agencies, provincial cancer care agencies, and national cancer charities. CCRA is motivated by the belief that, through effective collaboration, Canadian cancer research funding organizations can maximize their collective impact on cancer control and accelerate discovery for the ultimate benefit of Canadians affected by cancer. The CCRA is supported by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer through a financial contribution from Health Canada. For more information, please visit: http://www.ccra-acrc.ca


  • The Terry Fox Foundation tackles "unmet cancer needs" with $13.6-million for rare tumour, lymphoma and early-stage prostate and esophogeal cancer research

    by User Not Found | Oct 09, 2013

    Left to right: Dr. Paul McDonald, staff scientist at the BC Cancer Agency and 11-years cancer free (survivor of follicular lymphoma); Dr. David Huntsman, pathologist and medical director, Centre for Applied and Translational Genomics, BC Cancer Agency; Dr. Brian Wilson, senior scientist, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network (Toronto); Ms Judith Fox-Alder, international director, The Terry Fox Foundation; Dr. Randy Gascoyne, research director, Centre for Lymphoid Cancers, BC Cancer Agency; Dr. Sam Abraham, vice president strategic relationships and research, BC Cancer Agency; and Mr. Doug Nelson, president and CEO BC Cancer Foundation.


    ATTENTION MEDIA: October 9, 2013

    The Terry Fox Foundation tackles "unmet cancer needs" with $13.6-million for rare tumour, lymphoma and early-stage prostate and esophogeal cancer research




    Dr. David Huntsman, MD


    Dr. Randy Gascoyne, MD


    Brian Wilson, PhD
    Vancouver, B.C. - Three exemplary Canadian cancer research teams are receiving $13.6 million from the Terry Fox Foundation to conduct cutting-edge research in several areas where there are unmet cancer needs, it was announced today by the Terry Fox Research Institute and partners.

    In Ontario, scientists are applying new techniques using lasers and nanotechnologies to improve imaging and treatments for early-stage prostate and esophogeal cancers. In British Columbia, researchers are searching for new treatments for lymphoid cancer and rare and unusual tumours. The Terry Fox Foundation funds are raised annually by school children and supporters from coast to coast who participate in or donate to the Terry Fox Run and National School Run Day.

    "For over three decades, the Terry Fox Foundation has been funding research into 'new frontiers' science to ensure that fundamental questions in cancer research are probed and addressed," said Dr. Victor Ling, president and scientific director of the Terry Fox Research Institute. "Without these investigations, we would lack the knowledge and technology we have today of this complex disease. This kind of research is critical to the creation of innovative solutions within our cancer care clinics worldwide. It takes excellent scientists like those we are funding today to push forward with cutting-edge research."

    "We are proud of the legacy that has been built over the past three decades by Terry Fox supporters to fund excellence in team science which tackles major problems and issues in cancer research. This important work would not be possible without the generosity of the millions of Canadians who keep Terry's dream alive today," said Judith Fox-Alder, younger sister of Canadian hero Terry Fox, for whom the Foundation and Institute are named.

    Dr. David Huntsman's team, at the BC Cancer Agency in Vancouver, BC, is studying rare cancers - sarcomas and uterine/ovarian cancers with the aim to unlocking their genetic mutations, so that those, and eventually more common cancers, will be treated more successfully. "Rare tumours offer some real advantages because they tend to be more homogeneous [similar in structure], so it's easier to find what mutation is actually causing that cancer," said Dr. Huntsman, a pathologist and medical director at the Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics. "These cancers can also be keys to unlocking biology which is important for other more common cancers."

    Two emerging technologies being developed by Dr. Brian Wilson's team, based at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, may be able to work together to address unmet needs in cancer control. The first technology is a new technique called photoacoustic imaging which combines light and sound to make high-resolution images of tumours that can be targeted for treatment. The second technology uses their newly discovered nanoparticles to act as contrasting agents for the photoacoustic imaging. His team will apply this innovative approach to early-stage prostate and esophogeal cancers. "The combination of these two techniques is what makes this a unique opportunity," said Dr. Wilson, a senior scientist at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. "This funding is being used to accelerate this technology platform into human use."

    Dr. Randy Gascoyne's team, also based at the BC Cancer Agency, is looking to catalogue genetic differences in biopsy cells in non-Hodgkin lymphomas to determine why some patients have cancers that behave more aggressively than others. ""We are going to try and determine the genetic underpinnings that define those people whose primary therapy fails," said Dr. Gascoyne, research director for the Centre for Lymphoid Cancer. The Terry Fox Foundation has been the main funding source that has allowed Gascoyne's team to become one of the leading lymphoma genomics centres in the world.

    These three scientists lead outstanding research teams that have been selected as the best groups for New Frontiers funding for their excellence and impact. Dr. Wilson is receiving a first award of $2.249 million to be paid over the next three years. The two BC Cancer Agency projects are receiving renewal funding: Dr. Huntsman's team is awarded $7.5 million over five years. Dr. Gascoyne's team is receiving $3.885 million over three years, with $600,000 provided by the BC Cancer Foundation.


    Paul McDonald and Judith Fox-Alder view sample with Dr. Randy Gascoyne in his laboratory at the BC Cancer Agency. Photos courtesy of Cameron Heryet, BC Cancer Agency
    "The BC Cancer Foundation is pleased to support Dr. Gascyone's innovative project that has the potential to create major breakthroughs in lymphoid cancer treatments from which we all benefit. We are also excited to be the first Foundation to partner with the Terry Fox Foundation and are confident that as partners in discovery we will bring significant hope to the thousands of British Columbian's that are impacted by cancer," said Doug Nelson, president and CEO of the BC Cancer Foundation.

    The BC Cancer Foundation contribution marks the first time a partner has co-funded a Terry Fox New Frontiers Program Project Grant since the program was created over 30 years ago. A highly competitive program, funds are awarded annually to groups of investigators to support breakthrough and transformative biomedical research which may form the basis for innovative cancer prevention, diagnosis and/or treatment. The program is unique in Canada for its sustaining support for a small but significant number (currently 12) of the most productive and internationally recognized cancer research groups. The program is the flagship research initiative of the Terry Fox Foundation. In early 2013, the TFRI assumed management oversight for the program, and now manages the complete research investment portfolio (approximately $26 million annually) of the Terry Fox Foundation.

    About TFF
    The Terry Fox Foundation maintains the vision and principles of Terry Fox while raising money for cancer research through the annual Terry Fox Run, Terry's CAUSE on Campus, National School Run Day and other fundraising initiatives. To date, over $600 million has been raised worldwide for cancer research in Terry Fox's name. The first Terry Fox Run was held in 1981, with The Terry Fox Foundation being created in 1988. Its national headquarters are located in Chilliwack, BC and it has offices in 9 provinces. www.terryfox.org.

    About TFRI
    Launched in October 2007, The Terry Fox Research Institute is the brainchild of The Terry Fox Foundation and today functions as its research arm. TFRI seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone-based approach to research that will enable discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. TFRI collaborates with over 50 cancer hospitals and research organizations across Canada. TFRI headquarters are in Vancouver, BC. www.tfri.ca

    For more information, contact:

    Kelly Curwin, Chief Communications Officer
    Terry Fox Research Institute
    604-675-8223; Cell: 778-237-8158
    kcurwin@tfri.ca

    Jenn Currie Communications Officer, BC Cancer Agency
    Provincial Health Services Authority
    604-675-8106; Cell: 778-877-6643
    jenn.currie@bccancer.bc.ca

    Erica Di Maio
    Public Affairs & Communications Associate
    Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
    University Health Network
    416-340-4636
    erica.dimaio@uhn.ca

    Monica Bisal
    Communications Specialist
    BC Cancer Foundation
    604-329-5654
    monica.bisal@bccancer.bc.ca
  • Terry Fox Research Institute-Led Study Develops New Clinical Tool That Accurately Classifies, Nine Out Of Ten Times, Benign And Malignant Spots On Lung CT Scans Of Smokers

    by User Not Found | Sep 04, 2013
     
    Dr. Stephen Lam & Dr. Martin Tammemagi


    ATTENTION MEDIA:
    • PICTURES
      • Dr. Martin Tammemagi Click Here
      • Dr. Stephen Lam Click Here
      • Dr. Lam and study participants Mr. Chris Douglas (Vancouver) view and discuss CT scans. 1, 2, 3, 4
        (Photo credits: BC Cancer Agency)
    • VIDEO
    September 4, 2013

    Embargoed by the New England Journal of Medicine until Wednesday, Sept. 4 at 5 p.m. EDT



    Terry Fox Research Institute-Led Study Develops New Clinical Tool That Accurately Classifies, Nine Out Of Ten Times, Benign And Malignant Spots On Cung CT Scans Of Smokers



    Original Article from The New England Journal of Medicine — Probability of Cancer in Pulmonary Nodules Detected on First Screening CT

    Vancouver, BC – A Terry Fox Research Institute(TFRI)-led study has developed a new clinical risk calculator software that accurately classifies, nine out of ten times, which spots or lesions (nodules) are benign and malignant on an initial lung computed tomography (CT) scan among individuals at high risk for lung cancer.

    The findings are expected to have immediate clinical impact worldwide among health professionals who currently diagnose and treat individuals at risk for or who are diagnosed with lung cancer, and provide new evidence for developing and improving lung-cancer screening programs.  A total of 12,029 lung cancer nodules observed on CTs of 2,961 current and former smokers were examined in the population-based study.

    The results, to be published in the Sept. 5th issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), will have an immediate impact on clinical practice, says co-principal investigator Dr. Stephen Lam, chair of BC’s Provincial Lung Tumour Group at the BC Cancer Agency and a professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia.

    “We already know that CT screening saves lives.  Now, we have evidence that our model and risk calculator can accurately predict which abnormalities that show up on a first CT require further follow up, such as a repeat CT scan, a biopsy, or surgery, and which ones do not. This is extremely good news for everyone – from the people who are high risk for developing lung cancer to the radiologists, respirologists and thoracic surgeons who detect and treat it. Currently, there are no Canadian guidelines for us to use in clinical practice.”

    In countries where guidelines do exist, they largely relate to nodule size. The pan-Canadian team’s prediction model, developed by Brock University epidemiologist Dr. Martin Tammemägi, includes a risk calculator that considers several factors in addition to size: older age, female sex, family history of lung cancer, emphysema, location of the nodule in the upper lobe, part-solid nodule type, lower nodule count and spiculation (presence of sharp or needle-like points). “Reducing the number of needless tests and increasing rapid, intensive diagnostic workups in individuals with high-risk nodules are major goals of the model,” says Dr. Tammemägi. The TFRI team used two sets of data to determine their findings, studying a total of 12,029 nodules from 2,961 persons  –  current and former smokers, aged 50-75, who had undergone low-dose CT screening. One set involved participants in the TFRI Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study from 2008 to 2010, where 1,871 persons with a total of 7,008 nodules (102 of which were malignant) were screened and followed.  The other set involved 1,090 persons with 5,021 nodules (of which 42 were malignant) who took part in several lung cancer prevention trials conducted by the BC Cancer Agency during 2000-2010 and were funded through the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI). In the former study, participants were followed for an average of three years; in the latter, for an average of eight-and-a-half years.

    Dr. Lam says the prediction model holds up even in cases where clinicians are faced with the toughest challenges; for example, deciding what to do when nodules are the approximate size of a blueberry or smaller.  While nodule size is one predictor of lung cancer, the largest nodule appearing on the CT was not necessarily cancerous. The pan-Canadian study team found that nodules located in the upper lobes of the lung carry an increased probability of cancer. In both data sets studied, researchers found that where cancer was present, fewer nodules were found.  This model will simplify the work involved, especially for radiologists, in evaluating and assessing nodules on scans, as well as respirologists and thoracic surgeons who must make decisions about tests and treatment for their patients.

    “An accurate and practical model that can predict the probability that a lung nodule is malignant and that can be used to guide clinical decision making will reduce costs and the risk of morbidity and mortality in screening programs,” wrote Dr. Lam and study colleagues in the article, titled: Probability of Cancer in Pulmonary Nodules Detected on First Screening Computed Tomography.”   “The findings in this study bolster the potential for the successful implementation of a lung cancer screening program using low-dose computed tomography (CT) within a high-risk population.  This tool, combined with CT-screening, will increase our success in earlier detection, diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Further, this model combined with new guidelines for best clinical practice, will provide our health care system with both effective and affordable tools to implement such a program,” says Nova Scotia thoracic surgeon Dr. Michael Johnston, a member of the study team. Dr. Johnston serves on the executive of the Terry Fox Research Institute and is chair of the medical advisory committee of Lung Cancer Canada.

    “Many jurisdictions throughout the world are now considering whether or how to best implement lung cancer screening. Studies like this one are key to answering important questions so decisions are most likely to result in good practice and planning, and ultimately benefit patients,” says Dr. Heather Bryant, vice-president, cancer control at the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer.

    The significant findings come on the heels of the U.S. National Lung Screening Trial (2011) that found a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality with the use of low-dose thoracic computed tomography.

    Dr. Christine Berg, co-principal investigator of the National Lung Screening Trial and former chief, Early Detection Research Group, division of cancer prevention, for the National Cancer Institute in the United States, says: “This important work of Dr. Lam and colleagues is a major advance for clinicians performing lung cancer screening.  They provide a tool to grapple with the problem of the high rate of positive low-dose computed tomography scans.  Fewer follow-up scans with their attendant cost and fewer biopsies with their complications will need to be performed while continuing to diagnosis lung cancer at an early stage to lower mortality.  Coupled with continued public health efforts to lower cigarette smoking, this work will have international impact on the leading cause of cancer death worldwide.”

    The Pan-Canadian study is funded by the TFRI, the research arm of the Terry Fox Foundation, and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. The BCCA study was supported by the United States Public Health Service National Cancer Institute. In Canada, lung cancer kills over 20,000 Canadians annually. It is the primary cause of cancer deaths in Canada. One in 12 Canadians will receive a lung cancer diagnosis in his or her lifetime. With early detection, five-year survival rates can be over 70%.

    About TFRI/TFF: Launched in October 2007, The Terry Fox Research Institute (TFRI) is the brainchild of The Terry Fox Foundation (TFF).  TFRI seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone-based approach to research that will enable discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. TFRI collaborates with over 50 cancer hospitals and research organizations across Canada. The Terry Fox Foundation (TFF) maintains the vision and principles of Terry Fox while raising money for cancer research through the annual Terry Fox Run, National School Run Day and other fundraising initiatives which, to date, have raised over $600 million worldwide. The 33rd Terry Fox Run will take place across Canada at more than 800 community sites on Sunday, September 15. People are invited to run, walk, wheel, or ride up to 10km to raise funds to support cancer research. For more information, visit   www.tfri.ca and www.terryfox.org

    B-roll on You Tube (related video) : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KI5jPXG-N40

    For more information, please contact:

    Kelly Curwin, Chief Communications Officer
    Terry Fox Research Institute
    Office: 604-675-8223
    Cell: 778-237-8158
    kcurwin@tfri.ca
    Lenore Bromley, Media Relations
    Canadian Partnership Against Cancer
    416-915-9222 ext. 5781
    Cell: 416-710-9294
    lenore.bromley@partnershipagainstcancer.ca

    Jenn Currie, Communications Officer, BC Cancer Agency
    Provincial Health Services Authority
    604-675-8106
    Cell: 778-877-6643
    jenn.currie@bccancer.bc.ca

    Cathy Majtenyi, Research Communications/Media Relations Specialist
    Brock University
    905-688-5550  ext. 5789
    Cell: 905-321-0566
    cmajtenyi@brocku.ca

    Dr. Lam is available for media interviews
    Other experts available for comment:

    Dr. Martin C. Tammemägi,
    Brock University
    Dr. Heather Bryant, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer
    Dr. Christine Berg, Co-Principal Investigator, US National Lung Screening Trial


    Related photos and video available at www.tfri.ca
  • TFRI Statement on the Passing of Dr. Anthony (Tony) Pawson

    by User Not Found | Aug 12, 2013

    August 12, 2013

    We wish to express our profound sadness and loss over the death of Dr. Anthony (Tony) Pawson. Dr. Pawson was a leading cancer scientist at Mount Sinai’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto, Ontario who was revered worldwide for his seminal, transformative and innovative work in signal transduction. He has helped to advance cancer research and research in other diseases for his understanding of how cells communicate.

     

    Click Here for more information.

  • Study extended to June 2015

    by User Not Found | Jun 27, 2013

    Dr. Stephen Lam (BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver) , principal investigator of the Terry Fox Research Institute’s Pan-Canadian Early Lung Cancer Detection Study , speaks with Vancouver-site study participant and resident Mr. Chris Douglas, 65, who had a cancerous nodule surgically removed in 2011 after it was detected on a CT scan taken during the study. Photo credit: BC Cancer Agency.


    ATTENTION MEDIA: June 27, 2013

    Study extended to June 2015
    The Terry Fox Research Institute and partners inject $1.5 million into national lung cancer study to answer additional key questions about screening high-risk individuals

    Vancouver, BCThe Terry Fox Research Institute, Lung Cancer Canada, the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, the BC Cancer Foundation and site partners are injecting a total of $1.5 million into TFRI’s pan-Canadian study to detect early lung cancer so investigators can determine how frequently, and for how long, individuals at high risk for lung cancer should be screened.

    TFRI is providing up to $1.3 million to the project with contributions of $100,000 from Lung Cancer Canada, $61,900 from the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation and $48,300 from the BC Cancer Foundation. The funding will enable the national Early Lung Cancer Detection Study’s clinical investigators to offer a third screening CT scan to its 2,500 study participants four years after their first low-dose CT to provide additional information on these two key screening parameters. The study will be extended to June 2015 from its current June 2013.

    “There is a unique window – really a one-time opportunity – for our investigators to gather this data from a very select cohort of high-risk individuals to fill what is currently a gap in knowledge. We will not have this information if the cohort disbands now. TFRI is extremely grateful to our partners for their funding to support this new aspect of the study. We anticipate it will contribute to important recommendations about a potential screening program, its benefits and its costs,” said Dr. Victor Ling, TFRI president and scientific director.

    “Our public opinion polls have found overwhelming public support for a national lung cancer screening program in people at high risk,” said Dr. Natasha Leighl, president of Lung Cancer Canada. “Lung Cancer Canada is proud to support this important research, which will help us to implement lung cancer screening in the safest, most cost-effective way possible. Timely, low-dose CT screening of high-risk populations will represent a major step forward in the fight against Canada’s leading cancer killer, sparing the lives of thousands of Canadians annually and offering hope where, previously, there was only worry and despair.”

    TFRI’s national, $7.16 million, five-year study (2008-2013) is co-funded by The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) and is focused on the effectiveness of a web-based risk assessment model and simple breath and blood tests as a first step for detecting early lung cancer. To date, 4.6% of the participants have been diagnosed with cancer.

    “I’ve been receiving CTs annually since I first joined the study in 2008. I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that my participation in the study saved my life,” said Vancouver resident and study participant Mr. Chris Douglas, 65. He had a cancerous nodule, detected on an early CT, surgically removed in 2011. Today, he is an active swimmer and grandfather of two. The former smoker quit when he joined the study.

    “We already know our study is helping to save lives. This additional funding will enable us to collect and analyze new data that will help us to evaluate screening for individuals with high risk. It will also allow data from our study to more easily be compared with current studies already published, such as the National Lung Screening Trial,” said Dr. Stephen Lam, a lead investigator of the study, who is chair of BC’s Provincial Lung Tumour Group at the BC Cancer Agency and a professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia. “We believe this new information will, potentially, save more lives and provide the health system with relevant economic data for the development of an effective and affordable way to implement a national screening program.”

    The U.S. study found that low-dose CT scans were effective in reducing lung cancer mortality by 20 per cent in a similar high-risk group.

    Currently, eight cities are involved in the Canadian study: Vancouver, Calgary, Hamilton, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec City, Halifax and St. John’s. All will participate in the extended study. No new participants are being recruited.

    Preliminary study findings are expected within the next year.

    About TFRI
    Launched in October 2007, The Terry Fox Research Institute is the brainchild of The Terry Fox Foundation and today functions as its research arm, managing its complete research investment portfolio. TFRI seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone-based approach to research that will enable discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. TFRI collaborates with over 50 cancer hospitals and research organizations across Canada. TFRI headquarters are in Vancouver, BC. www.tfri.ca

    About LCC
    Lung Cancer Canada is a national charitable organization that serves as Canada’s leading resource for lung cancer education, patient support, research and advocacy. It is the only organization focused solely on lung cancer in Canada. For more information on Lung Cancer Canada, please visit www.lungcancercanada.ca.

    Note to editors:
    B-roll (includes interviews) and photos of Dr. Lam and Mr. Douglas are available at www.tfri.ca

    Mr. Douglas is available for interviews between 1-2 p.m. PDT on Thursday, June 27 at the BC Cancer Research Centre. Please contact K. Curwin to arrange.

    Backgrounder available

    For more information, contact:

    Kelly Curwin, Chief Communications Officer
    Terry Fox Research Institute, Vancouver BC
    W: 604-675-8223
    C: 778-237-8158
    kcurwin@tfri.ca

    Arielle Densen
    Lung Cancer Canada
    T: 212-358-8515, ext.5
    adensen@tillerllc.com

    Alison Colina
    BC Cancer Foundation
    T: 604.802.6984
    allison.colina@bccancer.bc.ca
  • Terry Fox Research Institute and Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation Partner On Innovative Tumour-Targeting

    by User Not Found | Apr 10, 2013

    SHRF & TFRI Logos 


    Dr. Ayman Mohammad. Photo credit: Debra Marshall

    Terry Fox Research Institute and Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation Partner On Innovative Tumour-Targeting Approach For Treating Cancer

    SASKATOON: The Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) and the Terry Fox Research Institute (TFRI) are pleased to announce Dr. Ayman Mohammad as the first recipient of the Terry Fox Postdoctoral Fellowship, to be held at the University of Saskatchewan’s (U of S) College of Pharmacy and Nutrition. The award, won in a highly competitive process, provides $50,000 a year for two years, allowing Dr. Mohammad to come from overseas to conduct his leading-edge work in Saskatoon, alongside Dr. Azita Haddadi, his fellowship supervisor.

    “We are very pleased to have a researcher of Dr. Mohammad’s caliber receive this award,” said June Bold, SHRF Chief Executive Officer. “SHRF’s Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program aims to advance health research careers and research productivity. Our partnership with TFRI, its community of cancer researchers and broader community of survivors, patients and families, provides a unique environment for this promising research.”

    “This fellowship supports research excellence and connects Dr. Mohammad to a national team of top researchers across Canada who, through funding from the Terry Fox Foundation, work collaboratively on finding solutions for understanding, diagnosing and treating cancer. We thank the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation and our supporters here in Saskatchewan who participate in our annual school and community runs to raise money to make research possible in important areas like the one Dr. Mohammad is studying – cancer vaccines and immunotherapy. Your dollars are helping us to work together to find better solutions for treating cancer,” said Dr. Victor Ling, TFRI President and Scientific Director.

    Conventional cancer treatments often fail, leading to tumour recurrence. This may be due to an inability of patients’ immune systems to recognize cancer cells as something to attack. Hence, cancer vaccines must be specially designed to stimulate the immune system against cancer. Dr. Mohammad is exploring the use of polymeric nanoparticles as a better way of doing that. These biodegradable particles are attracting scientific attention as potential drug-delivery devices, with a role in targeting specific tissues. Dr. Mohammad’s goal is to generate sufficient evidence to begin testing the approach in human trials.

    “We congratulate Dr. Mohammad on being the first recipient of this new award, which helps build leadership here in cancer research. We are pleased that Ayman will be conducting his work in the prairie region,” said Dr. James Davie, TFRI’s Prairie Node leader and a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics at the University of Manitoba (U of M).

    “Polymeric nanoparticles are a versatile platform of drug delivery systems for cancer immunotherapy and are progressing rapidly to provide a more effective cancer treatment solution. We wish him much success in his work.” TFRI’s Prairie Node encompasses cancer research partners in both Saskatchewan and Manitoba. In addition to SHRF, both the U of S and U of M are TFRI partners.

    The fellowship is co-funded by SHRF and TFRI, who share the goal of supporting research that increases our understanding of cancer, from early detection to diagnosis, treatment, and potential cure. This partnered fellowship brings a top-notch new scientist to Saskatchewan, adding capacity here to tackle the cancer challenge.

    About SHRF

    The Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (www.shrf.ca) is the provincial agency that funds and facilitates health research in Saskatchewan. SHRF works in partnership with other organizations locally, provincially, and nationally to foster leading-edge research.

    About TFRI

    Launched in October 2007, The Terry Fox Research Institute is the research arm of The Terry Fox Foundation. TFRI seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone-based approach to research that will enable discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. TFRI collaborates with over 50 cancer hospitals and research organizations across Canada as MOU partners. TFRI headquarters are in Vancouver, BC. www.tfri.ca

    For more information, contact:

    June Bold, Chief Executive Officer
    Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation
    Ph: (306) 975-1680

    Kelly Curwin, Chief Communications Officer
    Terry Fox Research Institute
    Ph: (604)-675-8223; Cell: (778)-237-8158
    E-mail: kcurwin@tfri.ca

  • The Terry Fox Foundation provides $13.4 million for world-class, novel research into fighting cancer with viruses

    by User Not Found | Oct 11, 2012

    Participants at the announcement in Ottawa today visit Dr. Bell's lab


    ATTENTION MEDIA: OTTAWA, ON -- They are conducting breakthrough research into fighting cancer with viruses and investigating ways to treat acute leukemias and today two world-class, long-standing and prestigious national cancer teams received a combined $13.4 million shot in the arm from The Terry Fox Foundation (TFF) to continue their work. The funds are raised annually by TFF through its annual Terry Fox community and school runs and invested through its national research arm, The Terry Fox Research Institute (TFRI).

    The funding will support an Ottawa, Ontario-based team conducting research into oncolytic viruses (viruses that target cancer cells and leave healthy ones unharmed) to treat various forms of cancer and a Vancouver, British Columbia-based team exploring why acute forms of leukemia are difficult to treat. The teams will conduct their work from home institutes and laboratories in seven cities and four provinces in Canada. These elite and multidisciplinary “made-in-Canada” teams are known internationally, having both made seminal contributions for their work in oncolytic viruses (OVs) and normal and leukemic blood stems cells over the last several decades.

    “We are very pleased today to announce this important investment in human capital provided by two world-class scientific and clinical teams who, through continuing excellence, teamwork and investigation continue to open up new frontiers of knowledge and innovation in important areas of cancer research. There are, and will continue to be, many unsolved mysteries in cancer research which require the attention of brilliant minds if we are to bring new therapeutics and innovations to the clinic. We must continue to fuel this groundbreaking work if we are to overcome this disease,” said Dr. Victor Ling, TFRI president and scientific director.

    “We are fortunate to have these teams conducting their work in Canada as a result of funds raised under the Terry Fox name,” said Mr. Fred Fox, manager of supporter relations for The Terry Fox Foundation. “For 32 years, our volunteers and donors have made it possible for Canada’s best researchers to play an important role nationally and internationally in moving forward in understanding, diagnosing and treating this disease. Your contributions are helping us to make a difference worldwide.”

    The New Frontiers Program Project Grants is the flagship program of The Terry Fox Foundation's investment portfolio, funding team science and excellence in cure-oriented, biomedical research for nearly three decades. The annual competition is currently overseen by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research* in conjunction with TFRI and the awards are highly coveted by both applicants and recipients. In an increasingly competitive environment for research awards, these long-standing teams have demonstrated continuing excellence and an ability to remain novel and competitive year over year.

    Armed with $7.5 million**, the Ottawa-based team led by Dr. John Bell, a senior scientist at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and a professor of medicine at the University of Ottawa, will continue their innovative work as part of a trans-Canadian network of clinical and basic scientists who are focused on the application of oncolytic viruses as a way to treat cancer. Dr. Bell’s team includes scientists at the BC Cancer Agency (Victoria and Vancouver, BC) and Genome Sciences Centre (Vancouver, BC), McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario), University Health Network (Toronto, Ontario), Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (Ottawa, Ontario), Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (Ottawa, Ontario), McGill University (Montreal, Quebec) and Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia).

    “Our project aims to use the revolutionary approach of harnessing oncolytic viruses as biotherapeutics and creating effective, targeted anti-cancer agents that cause few, if any, side effects. This funding from The Terry Fox Foundation provides us with the opportunity to advance our basic science discoveries from the laboratory to the clinic, where they can be tested and developed for the treatment of cancer patients,” said Dr. Bell.

    The second team, based at Vancouver’s BC Cancer Agency in British Columbia, will receive $5.9 million over five years to find new ways to treat aggressive forms of leukemia by rapidly creating and using laboratory-built models that mimic human acute leukemias. The group has been a leader in contributing seminal work on why cures for this disease are hard to achieve. Fewer than one in five adult patients diagnosed with the acute form survive longer than 10 years. Many childhood patients will also not benefit from current treatments.

    “Our program harnesses the power of a research team whose expertise combines normal and leukemic stem cell biology, clinical knowledge and a range of sophisticated technologies to obtain cellular, molecular and genetic features of leukemic cells. A hallmark of our program is to exploit novel methods to reproducibly engineer in the laboratory models of aggressive leukemias directly from normal human blood forming cells. Such models open a pathway to resolve, with extremely high resolution, the differences between normal and leukemic blood stems cells and, ultimately, to identify novel therapeutic targets,” says the program project grant lead Dr. Keith Humphries, a distinguished scientist with the Agency’s Terry Fox Laboratory and a professor of medicine at the University of British Columbia. Two other researchers in the Laboratory and two investigators from the Genome Sciences Centre – all members of the BC Cancer Agency and professors at the University of British Columbia – will also be supported.

    TFF will be investing approximately $14 million in 2012-2013 for cure-oriented, biomedical discovery research and another $10 million for translational research through TFRI. The funds are raised by Canadians who participate each year in Terry Fox Runs, Terry’s CAUSE on Campus and the National School Run Day in honour of Terry Fox's Marathon of Hope.

    * TFRI acknowledges and thanks CIHR for its expertise in managing the selection and review of the successful programs.
    **CIHR is contributing a total of $50,000 to the COVCo project.

    About TFF
    The Terry Fox Foundation maintains the vision and principles of Terry Fox while raising money for cancer research through the annual Terry Fox Run, Terry’s CAUSE on Campus, National School Run Day and other fundraising initiatives. To date, over $600 million has been raised worldwide for cancer research in Terry Fox's name. The first Terry Fox Run was held in 1981, with The Terry Fox Foundation being created in 1988. Its national headquarters are located in Chilliwack, BC and it has offices in 9 provinces. www.terryfox.org.

    About TFRI
    Launched in October 2007, The Terry Fox Research Institute is the brainchild of The Terry Fox Foundation and today functions as its research arm. TFRI seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone-based approach to research that will enable discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. TFRI collaborates with over 50 cancer hospitals and research organizations across Canada. TFRI headquarters are in Vancouver, BC. www.tfri.ca

    For more information, contact:
    Kelly Curwin, Chief Communications Officer
    Terry Fox Research Institute
    Office: 604-675-8223; Cell: 778-237-8158
    E-mail: kcurwin@tfri.ca

    Paddy Moore
    Manager, Communications and Public Relations,
    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
    Gestionnaire, Communications et Relations publiques,
    Institut de recherche de l'Hôpital d'Ottawa
    Office: 613-737-8899 x 73687; Cell: 613-323-5680

    Patrick Blennerhassett, Communications Officer,
    Agency & External Communications
    Provincial Health Services Authority
    1380 Burrard Street 6th Floor Vancouver
    604-871-5699 media pager

    Research Partners and Principal Investigators


    Canadian Oncolytic Virus Consortium (COVCo) Team Members (2012-2017)

    Role Name Affiliation
    Program Leader and PI: Dr. John Bell Ottawa Hospital Research Institute University of Ottawa
    PI Dr. Jean-Simon Diallo Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
    PI Dr. Nahum Sonenberg McGill University
    PI Dr. David Stojdl Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa
    PI Dr. J Andrea McCart Toronto General Research Institute, UHN
    PI Dr. Brad Nelson British Columbia Cancer Agency, UBC
    PI Dr. Brian Lichty McMaster University
    PI Dr. Jonathan Bramson McMaster University
    PI Dr. Patrick Lee Dalhousie University
    PI Dr. David Stojdl Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa
       

    Core Pathogenic Pathways in Human Leukemia Team Members (2012-2017)

    Role Name Affiliation
    Program Leader and PI Dr. R Keith Humphries Terry Fox Lab, BC Cancer Agency, UBC
    PI Dr. Connie Eaves Terry Fox Lab, BC Cancer Agency,UBC
    PI Dr. Aly Karsan Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, UBC
    PI Dr. Andrew Weng Terry Fox Lab, BC Cancer Agency, UBC
    PI Dr. Martin Hirst Genome Sciences Centre, UBC
  • The Terry Fox Foundation announces Governor General of Canada as Patron

    by User Not Found | Sep 11, 2012


    MEDIA ADVISORY/PHOTO OPPORTUNITY:
    • WHAT: His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston Will Participate in The Terry Fox Run in Ottawa, Ontario
    • WHEN: Sunday, September 16, 2012
    • TIME: 8:40 am
    • WHERE: Anniversary Park on Carleton University campus
    • DETAILS: Joining His Excellency for the run will be members of the Fox Family, Terry Fox Run Organizers and Participants (including cancer survivors) and Carleton University students involved in Terry's CAUSE on Campus (CAUSE=College and University Student Engagement)
    Vancouver, BC -- The Terry Fox Foundation is pleased to announce that His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, is patron of the Foundation.

    "The Office of the Secretary to the Governor General welcomed and recognized Terry 32 years ago during a visit to Rideau Hall. Less than 3 months after his visit, Terry was invested as Companion of the Order of Canada and, in 1982, the fountain in front of the Rideau Hall façade was dedicated the Fountain of Hope. We are therefore extremely honoured that His Excellency has accepted this role and we know that both Betty and Terry would join us in welcoming him to the Foundation and its broader family of supporters and organizers," said Mr. Rolland Fox, father of Terry Fox.

    The Governor General is a strong supporter of Terry Fox, citing the young Canadian hero's contribution to the country and his generosity as an inspiration for all Canadians. During his installation speech in 2010, His Excellency spoke of how Terry's spirit and achievement brings Canadians together and how his cause endures three decades after the Marathon of Hope (1980).

    "As a Canadian cancer research institute focused on both discovery and translational research, as well as training future leaders (scientists and clinicians) in cancer research, this support from The Queen's representative in Canada, is a wonderful endorsement for the Foundation and the collaborative work our researchers are undertaking at the best cancer research hospitals and universities in Canada to improve outcomes for patients," said Dr. Victor Ling, president and scientific director of The Terry Fox Research Institute.

    His Excellency will participate in the Terry Fox Run in Ottawa on Sunday, September 16, 2012. This annual run held along the Rideau Canal will also be home to a new initiative involving students at Carleton University who are participating in Terry's CAUSE on Campus, a national event uniting students at universities and colleagues from coast to coast. (www.terryfox.org/terryscauseoncampus). As patron, His Excellency will also support the work of the Terry Fox Research Institute, which invests the funds raised annually from The Terry Fox Run, which raises approximately $24 million annually for cancer research in Canada.

    About TFF and TFRI

    To date The Terry Fox Foundation has raised over $600 million for cancer research worldwide. The Foundation maintains the vision and principles of Terry Fox while raising money for cancer research through the annual Terry Fox Run, National School Run Day and other fundraising initiatives. The Terry Fox Research Institute seeks to improve significantly the outcomes of cancer research for the patient through a highly collaborative, team-oriented, milestone driven approach to research with the goal of enabling discoveries to translate quickly into practical solutions for cancer patients worldwide. The headquarters for the Foundation and the Institute are in British Columbia.


    To speak to Mr. Darrell Fox, please contact:
    Helen Cranney
    604 675 8222
    hcranney@tfri.ca

    To speak to Mr. Fred Fox, please contact:
    Claire Smid
    604 701 0246
    csmid@terryfoxrun.org
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